The Road Overbridge – Part 2

The bridge is coming along and is now close to finished (constructionally).

It has taken a lot of time with plastic filler to get the stones to meet neatly at the corners and also to be coursed sensibly at the corners.  Having said this, I am inclined to think it is one of the more important parts of modeling structures and buildings.  Cracks or missing sides/ends on a building are just a total no no and even an untrained eye (I am a chartered surveyor so it is worse for me!) spots the error immediately.

This is where we have got too:

Lots of filler in evidence - but there is still more too do!

Lots of filler in evidence – but there is still more too do!

The abutments end on

The abutments end on

With a carriage to give a sense of scale - the Microrail Drummond All Third has only been on the stocks for 15 years...........

With a carriage to give a sense of scale – the Microrail Drummond All Third has only been on the stocks for 15 years………..

 

I am not happy with the string course at the moment, it sticks out too abruptly and possibly the same for the copings to the top of the parapet – so more filing and sanding………….

However, it does look like a bridge and I doubt the civils guys will condemn it!

 

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About highlandmiscellany

Just playing trains; my weekday life is a bit more serious though!

Posted on April 15, 2013, in Glenmutchkin, Workbench (other) and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Well this civils guy thinks it’s a pretty fine rendition of a bridge 🙂

  2. Hi, that is very nice. It looks to me like Wills sheets. If it is could you explain how you have curved it. Heat in someway I presume. If it’s not Wills – well that’s an untrained eye at work! 🙂
    Many thanks
    RichardS

  3. Hi Richard,

    The stone is in fact Slaters dressed stone sheet (the large one, aimed at 7mm guys really I think). It is vacuum formed and fairly thin so it curves with little bother – except that the wing walls are battered (they lean over slightly) and curved, which means the coursing is not exactly parallel. You can see this slightly in the views where the top is parallel with the ground but the bottom is not – however, this will get lost in the groundworks when these are done.

    Curving the wing walls needed a bit of brute force and ignorance rather than heat (although I do hear that people use boiling water to soften plasticard). I used sheets of not more than 60 thou and laminated two or three to keep them together. This is why I needed to drill holes to allow the solvent to escape!

    Mark

    • Thanks Mark. I think using ‘non-scale’ items is quite legit. Often overlooked that in nature, rocks, trees, and stone blocks (but not bricks) etc are not always to ‘scale’. It always amuses me that things are advertised as for example: ‘N’ gauge trees. Green stuff always useful! 🙂

  4. Pleased it passed the test Jamie!!

    I have to admit that my father is a (retired) bridge engineer, so I have been brought up with bridges all my life so do know how they work (which with any building/copnstruction model is the key to understanding how they should look).

    Mark

  1. Pingback: One for the Gorilla – tracklaying progress | highland miscellany

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