The Cruellest Cut – Carrying on with Hornby’s Gresley Buffet

The first task in dealing with ready to run vehicles is to work out how to get into them – not always as easy as it sounds! In this case, this is achieved by slipping finger nails between the sides and the underframe solebars; this releases four catches and the top pops off. The interior then slips out without bother but the glazing is a little more tricky as it is secured with some very gooey glue. Whilst this releases the perspex relatively easily, it was difficult to then remove the remaining glue – I found it best to do this by rolling it with a thumb and accumulating the residue on a scrap of paper but it was a pain getting it all off.

Prior to attacking the model with knife and blade, a sensible precaution is to protected all of the areas that are not to be cut with masking tape, which you will see I have done. This was effective but I did find that I dislodged a filler pipe when I removed it, so perhaps a slip of paper over these would be prudent next time.photo 4

Then it was time to get cutting; I varied between using a razor saw and a scalpel to cut a grove by using parallel cuts but in both cases it is important to cut to the waste side of the finished line. I found that it was best to work to an existing bead line, even though when working to the saloon end of the coach the bead was the side of door jamb (this is where I found the knife best and I made sure this was one of the first cuts to be made) so that there was no stress on the thin piece of material. By the time the cutting had been finished the holes were quite big!

photo 15

Nearly all the cutting done now; but the last panel to the right did also get cut away

It pays to dress the sides of the opening with care so that they are straight and square as this makes the fitting of the infill pieces much easier. These should be cut fractionally over large and then sanded back by small degrees checking regularly to determine if it fits and taking care to ensure that the square/straight edges are maintained. Once it fits, I let it into the hole and secured with butonone and then left it to cure for a couple of hours so that I did not disturb it when I subsequently fitted the beading. This was formed with 0.2 * 0.2mm microstrip and these needed to be set out with considerable care – aided by the use of venier calipers – to get them regularly spaced and vertical. Even the most minor of inconsistencies detract from the affect.

photo 11

Replacement panels now in place, including a partial infill of the window by the door

Next up was the removal of the various roof vents and cowls as these too changed.  I suspect that these were no consistent across differing vehicles and it is quite difficult to determine what goes where but I was assisted by some photographs from here.  Utilising some of the vents salvaged from the Hornby model and also from Comet Models, the latter generally with their shields filed away as the roof views I have have straight flanges as shields – which I formed with brass strip as I though plasticard would be knocked off.

photo 1 (2)

Roof vents in place, based on a photograph of the roof of 9132 at SRPS in the 1970s.  I also noted that the alarm gear on the roof was at the other end of the vehicle in comparison to the Hornby model, so this is going to need to be cut away and recreated at the opposite end.

Advertisements

About highlandmiscellany

Just playing trains; my weekday life is a bit more serious though!

Posted on August 23, 2015, in Workbench (stock) and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Two Bolt Chair

4mm finescale modelling, slowly

Model Railway Musings by D827 Kelly

Model railway planning, design, building and other things related

Pembroke:87

Modelling the Canada Atlantic Railway into Pembroke in Proto:87

SOUTH PELAW JUNCTION

Documenting and Modelling the History of the Tyne Dock to Consett Line

Liverpool Range

Modelling a small section of the New South Wales Railways between Kankool and Pangela

highland miscellany

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Llangunllo

Modelling the WR in the 1950s

Great Western Railway Review

Recording and reporting articles and items of interest relating to the Great Wwestern Railway of Brunel, Goocg, Churchward and Collett et al and to modelling it in 4mm and 7mm scales.

Matt's Railroad Blog

Minnesota themed model railroading

GrahamMuz: Fisherton Sarum & Canute Road Quay

The model railway world and mainly Southern meanderings of Graham 'Muz' Muspratt

Gene's P48 Blog

Quarter-inch Scale Modeling

Dales Peak

Set in the Derbyshire Peak District, this is a shed based, OO Gauge, modern image, DCC, model railway

P4NewStreet

Building a Model of Birmingham New Street, set in 1987

DEFine

Modern railway modelling in the Midlands

petesworkshop

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Llangunllo.

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Loco Yard

Heritage & Model Railway Blog

The Erratic and Wandering Journey

Railway Modelling in S Scale (1:64)

Ouse Valley Modeller

Ouse Valley Modeller is a blog about my 4mm OO gauge modelling, my observations mostly about Sussex railways in the 1950's and my layout Herstmonceux

cardigan bay coastal railroad

A fictious railroad in 0n30

Morpeth In O-Scale

Why Settle For Half When You Can Have The Whole O?

Portwilliam

Southwest Scotland in 00 Finescale

westhighlandmodelling

Modelling the West Highland Railway & Beyond

Oswestry Works

Locomotive works diorama in 4mm

Port Rowan in 1:64

An S scale study of a Canadian National Railways branch in Ontario - in its twilight years

clecklewyke

from little acorns...

%d bloggers like this: