Blog Archives

Best Work Trip Ever – Signals and a Sad Reprise

Following the tragic events in Sri Lanka recently, I pondered whether I would complete the intended final post of the series I had in mind.  I have concluded that I would primarily because the experience that I had of Sri Lanka and its people was so friendly and felt so safe.  So this post is my small bit of illustrating that Sri Lanka is not the country that was illustrated by the acts of a few deranged members of the population.

One of the joys of Sri Lanka’s railways is the retention of widespread railway relics from times past – in particular the signalling.  Whilst there are modernised sections, substantial sections are still firmly in the first half of last century with full semaphore signals, tablets and block sections.  Although a few arms have been removed, the bulk of the installations are still in situ and largely in use; so it is a bit of a cornucopia of signalling.  Here are a few of the signals that I saw:

_DSC0378 (3)

_DSC0365 (2)

_DSC0384 (4)

_DSC0393 (3)

_DSC0293 (3)

_DSC0397 (4)

The signalling that I saw was all Saxby and Farmer – I only saw a couple of the lines in the country so it may be that there are other suppliers in evidence.  The ground signals were quite similar to the McKenzie & Holland equivalents and tended to come in batches – looking like sentinels from an episode of Dr Who!

_DSC0351 (3)

I thought the signal boxes looked decidedly home counties, although the rather shocking salmon pink wouldn’t have been found in Hertfordshire or Surrey I hazard!

_DSC0395 (3)

With the exception of the signalman’s attire, the inside of the signal box was instantly recognisable to any UK railwayman of the last century of a half (well perhaps any UK railwayman of the last 40 years would be surprised to see so few white levers………).

_DSC0402 (2)

_DSC0400 (2)

This is the inside of Kandy’s signal box.  Kandy is largely a terminus with the line from the Highlands and Columbo meeting here, along with a branch.  With five platform faces and only moderate amounts of sidings, it struck me as a perfect modelling track plan if anyone wants to have a go!  Here is the view from the steps of the box, along with the signalling diagram.

_DSC0404

_DSC0403 (2)

The approach to Kandy was in the process of being doubled when I visited, so I suspect that it will be resignalled with colour lights when this is done – so you had best get there soon if you want to see it like this………….

_DSC0398 (2)

 

 

Advertisements

Best Work Trip Ever – now in the Hill Country

With plenty of justification, the most well known line in Sri Lanka is up into the hill country – from Kandy to either Elle or Badulla.   The line was constructed during the colonial era to reach what was then Sri Lanka’s most important economic asset, tea.  The hill country being famous for tea plantations – and there really are a lot of them!  The views below genuinely representative of long stretches of the line.

_DSC0306 (2)

IMG_0656 (2)

_DSC0272

_DSC0338

_DSC0319

The line twists and winds through the hills often crossing from one side of the hill side to the other through a large number of tunnels.  At one portion, the line really was travelling along the top of a mountain ridge with steep slopes falling away to both sides.

_DSC0274 (2)

IMG_0645 (2)

Sometimes tea pickets were visible and so too were tea factories, such as these ones.

_DSC0307

_DSC0283

There was a fairly significant amount of traffic on the line; we crossed or overtook around seven trains.  Some were headed by relatively modern sets such as the class S12 multiple unit set built in China that is in the video at the base of the post but there were also much older diesel units such as this class M5 dating from 1979 (and far from the oldest loco’s on the island!).

_DSC0373 (2)

_DSC0323 (2)

_DSC0270 (2)

Besides the stunning scenery, probably the biggest thrill is the rather old fashioned (to a westerner anyway) attitude to riding on the trains.  Getting the best view of the line by literally hanging on like this was quite normal and I did it for hours.  Doing that in the UK would quite quickly get me a visit from the British Transport Police and a potentially a bit of a write up in the local paper!

_DSC0364 (2)

Obviously, being in south asia, rules are largely there for breaking such as not bothering with the footbridge (or indeed road home).  This lot were getting the station staff quite agitated, the reason being a train was already visible in the near distance!

_DSC0355

_DSC0356.JPG

Sri Lankan railway staff are clearly very proud of their railway; the fella below was not unrepresentative of the station masters that lined every station – very dapper!

_DSC0387 (2)

The hill country is relatively cool (being why the colonials decamped there in the summer months) but the line drops significantly by the time it reaches Kandy.  So much so, tea plantations give way to paddy fields and farm land – all still very lush, Sri Lanka being an island is notably more green than, say, nearby India.

_DSC0390 (2)

The train journey is hardly fast = my journey (from Elle to Kandy, so not quite the end of the line) took seven and a half hours which is about twice the duration of the equivalent bus journey.  But then, I would not have experienced one of the best train rides I have even had and all that for a heady £1.40 – plus I could have halved the cost if I had gone third class!

The modern DMUs are not nearly as exciting as the proper diesels (which do still appear on some trains, notably the overnight sleeper) and I wonder what it was like in the steam era?

Roger Farnworth

A great WordPress.com site

Penn Central Hitop Secondary Model Railroad

The building, history, and operation of my HO scale Hitop branch model railroad

Enterprising Limpsfield @ The Bull

a community hub in the heart of Limpsfield

Staffordshire Finescale

railway modelling group

MrDan's Model Musings.

Model railroad, prototype, historical and other random musings.

Edinburgh Princes Street

An interpretation of the passenger facilities of the former Edinburgh Princes St railway station

Dominion & New England Railway

Building an achievable O scale proto48 layout

A Model Meander

[mee-an-der] noun: a circuitous movement or journey.

Yeovil Model Railway Group (YMRG)

Making The Biggest Layouts That Will Fit In Our Huge Clubroom - since 1974

Central Vermont Railway

MODELLING MUSINGS ON PORTCHULLIN, GLENMUTCHKIN AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT TAKES MY FANCY

Chris Nevard Model Railways Blog

MODELLING MUSINGS ON PORTCHULLIN, GLENMUTCHKIN AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT TAKES MY FANCY

A Model Railway - Life in Miniature

MODELLING MUSINGS ON PORTCHULLIN, GLENMUTCHKIN AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT TAKES MY FANCY

Michael's Model Railways

MODELLING MUSINGS ON PORTCHULLIN, GLENMUTCHKIN AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT TAKES MY FANCY

Two Bolt Chair

4mm finescale modelling, slowly

Model Railway Musings by D827 Kelly

Model railway planning, design, building and other things related

Pembroke:87

Modelling the Canada Atlantic Railway into Pembroke in Proto:87

Liverpool Range

Modelling a small section of the New South Wales Railways between Kankool and Pangela

highland miscellany

MODELLING MUSINGS ON PORTCHULLIN, GLENMUTCHKIN AND ANYTHING ELSE THAT TAKES MY FANCY

Great Western Railway Review

Recording and reporting articles and items of interest relating to the Great Wwestern Railway of Brunel, Goocg, Churchward and Collett et al and to modelling it in 4mm and 7mm scales.

Matt's Railroad Blog

Minnesota themed model railroading

GrahamMuz: Fisherton Sarum & Canute Road Quay

The model railway world and mainly Southern meanderings of Graham 'Muz' Muspratt

Gene's P48 Blog

Quarter-inch Scale Modeling

dalespeak.wordpress.com/

Set in the Derbyshire Peak District, this is a shed based, OO Gauge, modern image, DCC, model railway

P4NewStreet

Building a Model of Birmingham New Street, set in 1987

DEFine

Modern railway modelling in the Midlands