Blog Archives

One for the Gorilla – tracklaying progress

Matters have been progressing with the layout on and off through the summer and a lot more of the track has now been laid.  We have both the main line and the full run around loop complete, along with most of the bay and its run around loop too.

photo 2

The line diverging in the foreground is going into the shed area, those visible below the bridge go to the bay (left) and yard (right).  A signalling trackplan can be found here.

photo 7

I quite like the sinuousness of the line, which can be seen here/  I have done this in order to give interest to the layoput but it is pretty typical (indeed characteristic) of the lines to the west coast as they wind through the mountainside.  I do have in mind some hills to justify this in the finished item.

photo 5   photo 1

Already there is a sense of magnitude to the station forming, the platform face (which is not all in view in either of these views, comes in at about 7 feet – enough for an eight coach train of pre-grouping coaching stock.  Really, its length is defined by the length of the bay – this will become clearer when the train shed appears because the bay has to start clear of this..

photo 13photo 4photo 12

I have also placed into its approximate position the road overbridge that separates the shed from the main station area.  The construction of this can be seen in postings here and here.  The intention of hte bridge is to act as a scene blocker and thus to compel the watcher to view the layout from more than one location to appreciate it.

Advertisements

Day Return to Castle Rackrent

You will recall that approximately a year ago, I posted about my last visit to Castle Rackrent and I mentioned that the layout was about to undergo a significant reconfiguration.  A month ago I had a chance to revisit Richard Chown and see how it is getting on.

Here are some photographs from my visit (but only a few as I had difficulties with low light levels):

Castle Rackrent Station

photo 25

Storms above Castle Rackrent

photo 32

St Juliet Town

photo 30

photo 28

As you can see, a number of stations are undergoing a rebuild.

photo 26

A lot of work remains, as large sections of the line remain simply track on bare track on boards and some fettling of the track will also be necessary but already there is a lot done.  Hopefully I will be able to visit again when things are a little more developed.

Also on view was Fangfoss which was in an even darker room, so no photos at all of the actual layout, but a few of the locos were elsewhere and here is a taster.

photo 27

You will be able to see Fangfoss for yourself (and it is worth I can assure you) at this year’s Scaleforum which will be held in Aylesbury on 19/20 September – details here .

See you there if you go!

No Point Hanging Around

Whilst I have not put any posts up showing progress with the boards for Glenmutchkin, progress is being made and the last two boards are essentially now finished.  I am hoping that with one more day’s work which will mostly be to build up a carrying box for the final two, they can all come home.

In anticipation of this, I have been building some turnouts and a bit of the basic trackwork.

_DSC0225compress_DSC0236compress

I am only able to do the turnouts which I am reasonably confident will not change shape when the track is finally laid out on the boards.  In essence this means the crossings in the bay, the main line and the goods yard.  I have also done one of the turnouts in the yard.  So seven down, twelve to go including a slip!

I have also developed my approach to TOU’s slightly from Portchullin.  As a finished article they look like this:

_DSC0232compress

You will see that relatively little of the TOU is exposed (and when it is painted it blend away further).  Equally it is much more durable than most of the other options out there because the switchblade is held by both a wire strip but also to some brass strip that is tight to the underside of both the switchrail and the switchblade.  By installing this strip in this location, the switchblade is held in a vertical plane much better than other solutions.  I think this leads to better running.

This is what it looks like as it is being assembled.  You will see that in essence is it is merely a bit of copper clad below the switchblades, but lowered somewhat further due to the use of the brass strip.  This allows the whole lot to be hidden below the boards.

_DSC0228compress _DSC0231compress

 

You will note the rather unusual arrangement of sleepers.  This is called interlacing and was very common on many pre-grouping lines, including the Highland.  I will expand on this in a future posting.

 

First Four Boards Complete!

Julian and I have been putting a bit more time in on the baseboards, to the point where the first four are complete with the exception of their varnishing/painting.

photo 4 (2)compress

photo 3 (2) compress

You will also see in the pictures that the beams that support the boards have also been completed.  These span between the brackets that were shown here which in turn are supported by bolts that have been affixed to the builders trestles.  This means that each point of contact can be adjusted for both overall level and also cant.  The idea is that this is done prior to placing the boards on the beams, so that the whole thing can be levelled as one and the boards then just get plonked on.  So long as the floor is not too wonky (like that in Tim & Julian’s place!), this does not take long and it is very idiot-proof assembling the layout perfectly each time.

photo 4compress

Also visible in the views are the gallows brackets that will support the lighting and facia.  These are fairly meaty as they have to span over 1300mm from front to back, so the moment on them is quite high.  What we have just found is that they are a tad low due to the beans being a bit higher than I had expected.  A bit of adjustment will be required in due course; especially as the layout level is also a bit high.

But the acid test of the new boards is shown in this view.  On Portchullin one of the problems is that the boards rise up slightly at the joints – a problem I see a lot on layouts.  This is dead flat; so we won’t see the trains doing any Casey Jones runs over the mountain ranges!

photo 5compress

The next visit will get on with the last two boards, which will take up the rather obvious space where Julian is working.  These will only be a single width in size as the boards are tapering in to 700mm wide at the end on the left in the view below.  To give a sense of scale, the yellow spirit level is 1200mm and the dark one 750mm.  (see Mr Ullyot – two spirit levels now………..)

photo 1 (2)compress

So thanks again to Tim & Julian and if any of readers are looking at electric loft ladders; give them a call.  S&T Joinery.

 

 

Last train to Castle Rackrent?

Last week I was able to visit Richard Chown’s house to have a play with Castle Rackrent at one of his operating sessions.

Castle Rackrent is both an individual layout and also a system; comprising a total of five stations, a harbour and a couple of fiddle yards.  It is based on Irish practise, so is all hand built to 5’3″ gauge.  Given that the layout is 7mm/1ft, it is pretty substantial and wraps around Richard’s basement a couple of times.  This creates the situation where it is somewhat of a challenge to know what is going on in any other location on the system – this does not matter as the stations communicate with each other via bell codes (well, only one adjacent station in our case due to a fault, so we adopted a version of the telegraph system known as shouting!).

It is fair to say, even with this and possibly due to some inexperience on my part, things still get chaotic.  We ended up with four of the six possible trains at our station at one point.  The normal controller Mr Summers was not in attendance fortunately, otherwise I sense some firm words might have been had…………  It was all good fun though and is not really a basis of operation I have experienced before, even though of course all it does is mimic the real thing.

Here are a few photographs; starting with the terminus and original station on the line, Castle Rackrent:

photo 2 photo 5 (2)

I spent my time (mostly successfully directed by Ian) at Moygraney, so here are rather more pictures of this station:

photo 1 photo 1 (2)photo 2 (4) photo 2 (6) photo 4 (2)photo 5

Immediately next to us was Mount Juliet Town):

photo 2 (3) photo 3 (2)photo 4 photo 2 (2)

It is worth noting the red tag on the rear of the brake van in the final picture above.  This is a form of tail light and one of the jobs of the signalman at each station is to check that the full train is there by checking that each train has a tail light.  The eagle eyed might also note a few coloured discs on the top of the wagons – these are a form of wagon label; each colour describing the station that the wagon is to be detached at.  It all adds to the the challenge of working the line.

The final two stations I have pictures of are Salruck Junction and Lisgoole:

photo 4 (3) photo 3 (3)

And the reason for the title of this post?

Fortunately, this was not the last train to Castle Rackrent; which will no doubt please the show manager of the Perth show (where the layout will appear in June 14) but it is the last to Castle Rackrent in its present form.  Richard has in mind changing the arrangement of the layout and introducing another station.  So it was still a historical evening.

Timber!

A fairly big day in Glenmutckin’s life today; the start on baseboards.

As I mentioned in the last post; a couple of my team who help on Portchullin made the mistake of both criticising my carpentry skills and then admitting that they ran a joinery business.  I guess you can see that they thus talked their way into a task and we spent day one in doing these today.

I know that a bad workman blames their tools; but by god having all the proper kit makes things much faster and a great deal more accurate!! To say nothing of someone who knows rather more about joinery than I do!!

_DSC0548 (2) compress

The intended design will be predominantly open design around a skin of ply.  Initially a rectangular box is being made, as above.  After we have made the first batch of these we will then laminate a further layer of ply around this to provide the material to support the raised scenery and also to house the rebates for the pattern makers dowels – when we have done it hopefully the pictures will make it more clear.

We got three of these boxes made today; here are two of them – what is particularly pleasing is that they are perfectly level across the joint (see the bit of timber laid across the joint).  This is an area that I really did not get right on Portchullin and I note that lots of other modellers don’t either – right up to the famous person modelling Leamington Spa.

_DSC0549 (2)compress

So thanks Tim and Julian – I am sure some signals can work their way back!

And a small plug for my hosts; if you are looking for a powered loft ladder; give them a try http://www.st-joinery.co.uk/electricloftladder.html?gclid=COfvoN-HyrwCFYWWtAodjCQAcw

A week on tour – part 1; way out west

I have been on travels a bit this week, firstly work took me down to Bath so I took the opportunity of visiting the Bristol/Avon area group of the Scalefour Society.  They meet weekly (I think) and tend to rotate around different venues – in this case they were at Paul Townsend’s for a visit to his layout Highbridge for a bit of a running session.

There seemed to be a preponderance of things called diesel hydraulics; not too sure what they are:

file 2

But there was some more sophisticated trains there:

file

Highbridge is a good layout, based on the station of that name.  This was where the S&D cross the GW main line from Bristol to Exeter which it did on the level as the two lines passed under a bridge.  It resulted in some rather complicated trackwork which is very model-able; even if there is some of the wrong type of green………

2261-at-Highbridge-Crossing-a

It is a well modelled layout as this shows:

Gordon Ashton Station

If perhaps a bit spoilt on the night by my mo.  Being done for prostrate cancer charity; so if you are feeling like this is a good cause then make a donation here

file

Thanks to Gordon Ashton and Tim Venton for the photos.

Cutting and Shutting

I wished to use builder’s trestles for the supports for Glenmutchkin as they fold down, are very sturdy and durable (and are fairly cheap).  But, I also wished to go for a fairly full depth on the layout and they only come in the one depth (about 26 inches).  This meant I needed to cut and shut them, to make them into a stretch trestle.

Fortunately, my father in law was over at the weekend, and he has had 40 years in the motor trade so could tell us a thing or two about how to cut and shut (sorry Bernard!).   So, coupled with my brother and his welder, we have managed to cut and shut the first three trestles (the others do not need the same treatment).

Here is my brother James hard at work on the smaller of the three.

_DSC0268compress

I need to sort out a better means of storing Portchullin’s lighting pelmets.  One of the lessons I have learnt from Portchullin is that it has too many odd shapes and insufficient thought on how it should be stored/transported.

 

Cutting the first Sod

Tomorrow should be a big day for Glenmutchkin, because if my brother remembers we will be cutting the first sod of the layout building.

Now all good railway lines start with a ceremonial cutting of the first sod by the Duchess of something or other; typically with a nice silver spade and after which everybody retires to the local hostelry for a fine dinner…………….whilst the navvies start the really hard work.  Well we probably will only be different by dropping the silver spade.

spadecompress2

More seriously, as long as he does not get blown away in the forecast storms, my brother will be bringing his welding kit over with him, so we can make a start on the big chunky bits.

Welding kit……………on a model railway; am I going crazy?   You’ll have to come back to find out!

Been Quiet – Sorry!

Whilst I have been quiet with regard to postings, I have been both modelling and doing other things.  I just have not really had the camera out much!

One of the “other things” I have been doing was exhibiting Portchullin at Wigan.  The layout threw its only real spanner at us on the first morning where we found that one of the Fulgerex’s had sent one of its electrical contacts into orbit (it has happened before) and thus would not operate.  A little bit of cussing and work below the board managed to get it to manually change to the loop and we thus did without the front siding all weekend.

I did not manage to get any pictures myself but “Black & Decker Boy” did take a rather good video:

This compliments the other really good video of the layout taken by “Highlandman” at Epsom a couple of years back:

Enterprising Limpsfield @ The Bull

a community hub in the heart of Limpsfield

Staffordshire Finescale

railway modelling group

MrDan's Model Musings.

Model railroad, prototype, historical and other random musings.

Edinburgh Princes Street

An interpretation of the passenger facilities of the former Edinburgh Princes St railway station

Dominion & New England Railway

Building an achievable O scale proto48 layout

A Model Meander

[mee-an-der] noun: a circuitous movement or journey.

Yeovil Model Railway Group (YMRG)

Making The Biggest Layouts That Will Fit In Our Huge Clubroom - since 1974

Central Vermont Railway

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Chris Nevard Model Railways Blog

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

A Model Railway - Life in Miniature

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Michael's Model Railways

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Two Bolt Chair

4mm finescale modelling, slowly

Model Railway Musings by D827 Kelly

Model railway planning, design, building and other things related

Pembroke:87

Modelling the Canada Atlantic Railway into Pembroke in Proto:87

Liverpool Range

Modelling a small section of the New South Wales Railways between Kankool and Pangela

highland miscellany

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Great Western Railway Review

Recording and reporting articles and items of interest relating to the Great Wwestern Railway of Brunel, Goocg, Churchward and Collett et al and to modelling it in 4mm and 7mm scales.

Matt's Railroad Blog

Minnesota themed model railroading

GrahamMuz: Fisherton Sarum & Canute Road Quay

The model railway world and mainly Southern meanderings of Graham 'Muz' Muspratt

Gene's P48 Blog

Quarter-inch Scale Modeling

Dales Peak

Set in the Derbyshire Peak District, this is a shed based, OO Gauge, modern image, DCC, model railway

P4NewStreet

Building a Model of Birmingham New Street, set in 1987

DEFine

Modern railway modelling in the Midlands

petesworkshop

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.

Llangunllo.

My modelling musings on Portchullin, Glenmutchkins and anything else that takes my fancy.